Linguistics is the scientific study of human language. This discipline concerns itself with the intrinsic knowledge that humans have about language and all aspects of language use. At the undergraduate level, the study of linguistics teaches students how to analyze languages to understand how they are structured and how they function.

In addition to an interest in language and an aptitude for analytic thinking, high scores on verbal, analytic, and quantitative aptitude tests are indicators of success in linguistics. Students must be able to reason logically and explicitly and deal with formulas and abstract symbols; those who pursue laboratory research in linguistics will also need training in statistical and experimental methodologies. Depending on their vocational goals, prospective linguistics students should consider pursuing their studies either through the M.A. in linguistics with a professional focus or through the doctorate; or they should take a second major. Appropriate companion fields include (but are not limited to) world languages, English, anthropology, sociology, speech and hearing science, psychology, mathematics, computer science, philosophy, and elementary and secondary education.

Bachelor of Arts in Linguistics

The Bachelor of Arts in linguistics is well rounded and encourages students to combine linguistics with interests in language, anthropology, computer science, speech pathology, and other areas.

Learning Outcomes

Students will have the:

  • ability to identify generalizations in language data;
  • ability to apply theoretical concepts to the analysis of language;
  • understanding of and ability to use scientific method;
  • ability to present a valid and sound argument; and
  • ability to identify the empirical shortfalls of a linguistic analysis and think creatively about alternative solutions.

Want to get started?

Learn more about the program, including courses, curriculum, and requirements here.

Minor in Linguistics

The undergraduate minor in linguistics is...

Learning Outcomes

Students will have the:

  • ability to identify generalizations in language data;
  • ability to apply theoretical concepts to the analysis of language;
  • understanding of and ability to use scientific method;
  • ability to present a valid and sound argument; and
  • ability to identify the empirical shortfalls of a linguistic analysis and think creatively about alternative solutions.

Want to get started?

Learn more about the program, including courses, curriculum, and requirements here.