Bob McMurray

Bob McMurray photo
Professor
Education:
PhD, Univeristy of Rocheser
Office:
E218 Seashore Hall
Phone:
319-335-2408
Office Hours:
Monday 11:30-1:00 Thursday 2:30-4:00
Curriculum Vitae:

Bob earned a BA in Psychology at Cornell University, and a Ph.D. in Brain and Cognitive Science from the University of Rocheser. He studies speech perception, word recognition, word learning and neuroscience in children, adults, and impaired populations using linguistic analysis, eye-tracking, neuroscience techniques and computational models.

Recent Publications

Refereed Publications

                        *          senior author, major contribution                    +          undergraduate author

                        **        secondary contribution                                   ++        graduate student author
                        ***      equal contribution                                           +++     post-doctoral author
                        ****    minor contribution

 

      * Trimble+++, A., McMurray, B., Cigrand+, N. and Tomblin, J.B. (in press) The process of spoken word recognition in the face of signal degradation: Cochlear implant users and normal-hearing listeners. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance.

      * McMurray, B., Kovack-Lesh, K., Goodwin+, D., and McEchron, W. (in press) Infant directed speech and the development of speech perception: Enhancing development or an unintended consequence? Cognition

      * Apfelbaum++, K., Bullock-Rest+, N., Rhone+++, A., Jongman, K., and McMurray, B. (in press) Contingent categorization in speech perception. Language, Cognition and Neuroscience (formerly Language and Cognitive Processes).

      **** Dunn, C., Walker, E., Kenworthy, M., Van Voorst, T., Tomblin, J.B., Oleson, J., Haihong, J., Kirk, K.I., McMurray, B., Hanson, M., and Gantz, B. (in press)  Longitudinal development of speech perception and language performance in pediatric cochlear implant users: the effect of age at implantation and long term outcomes.  Ear and Hearing

      ** Kovack-Lesh++, K.L., McMurray, B., Oakes, L.M. (in press) Four-month-old infants’ visual investigation of pairs of cats and dogs: Relations with pet experience and attentional strategy. Developmental Psychology

      * Toscano++, J., Anderson+, N., and McMurray, B. (in press) Reconsidering the role of temporal order in spoken word recognition. Psychonomic Bulletin and Review

      * Galle++, M., Apfelbaum++, K. & McMurray, B. (in press) Within-speaker variability benefits phonological word learning. Language Learning and Development

      * Farris-Trimble+++, A., and McMurray, B. (in press) The reliability of eye tracking in the Visual World Paradigm for the study of individual differences in real-time spoken word recognition.  Journal of Speech Language and Hearing Research.

      *** Wiffal++, T., McMurray, B., and Hazeltine, R. (in press) Similarity impairs motor learning: Implications for the power law of learning?  Journal of Experimental Psychology: General

      * Apfelbaum++, K., Hazeltine, E., & McMurray, B. (2013) Statistical learning in reading: Variability in irrelevant letters helps children learn phonics rules. Developmental Psychology, 49(7), 1348-

      ** Schlesinger, M., and McMurray, B. (2012) The past, present, and future of computational models of cognitive development. Journal of Cognitive Development, 27(4), 326-348.

      ** McMurray, B., Horst++, J., and Samuelson, L. (2012) Word learning emerges from the interaction of online referent selection and slow associative learning. Psychological Review, 119(4), 831-877

      * Toscano++, J., and McMurray, B. (2012) Cue-integration and context effects in speech: Evidence against speaking-rate normalization, Attention, Perception & Psychophysics, 74(6), 1284-1301.

      **** Kovack-Lesh++, K., Oakes, L., and McMurray, B. (2011) Contributions of attentional style and previous experience to 4-month-old infants’ categorization. Infancy

      * Apfelbaum++, K., & McMurray, B. (2011) . Using Variability to Guide Dimensional Weighting: Associative Mechanisms in Early Word Learning. Cognitive Science, 35(6), 1105-1138.

      * McMurray, B. & Jongman, A. (2011) What information is necessary for speech categorization? Harnessing variability in the speech signal by integrating cues computed relative to expectations. Psychological Review, 118(2), 219-246.

      *** Apfelbaum++, K., Blumstein, S., and McMurray (2011) Semantic priming is affected by real-time phonological competition: Evidence for continuous cascading systems.  Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 18(1), 141-149.

      *** Beckman, J., Helgason, P., McMurray, B. & Ringen, C. (2011) Rate Effects on Swedish VOT: Evidence for Phonological Overspecification. Journal of Phonetics, 39, 39-49

      *** Horst, J.S., Samuelson, L.K., Kucker++, S. & McMurray, B. (2011) What’s new? Children prefer novelty in referent selection. Cognition, 118(2), 234-244.

      * Toscano++, J., McMurray, B., Dennhardt+, J., & Luck, S. (2010) Continuous perception and graded categorization: Electrophysiological evidence for a linear relationship between the acoustic signal and perceptual encoding of speech. Psychological Science, 21(10), 1532-1540.

      * Rost++, G.C., and McMurray, B. (2010) Finding the signal by adding noise: The role of non-contrastive phonetic variability in early word learning.  Infancy, 15(6), 608-635.

      * Huette+, S., and McMurray, B. (2010) Continuous dynamics of color categorization.  Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 17(3), 348-354.

      *** Cole, J.S., Linebaugh++, G., Munson++, C., and McMurray, B. (2010) Unmasking the acoustic effects of vowel-to-vowel coarticulation: A statistical modeling approach.  Journal of Phonetics, 38(2), 167-184.

      * Toscano++, J., and McMurray, B. (2010) Cue Integration with Categories: A Statistical Approach to Cue Weighting and Combination in Speech Perception.  Cognitive Science, 34(3), 436-464.

      * McMurray, B., Samelson++, V., Lee++, S., and Tomblin, J.B. (2010) Individual differences in online spoken word recognition: Implications for SLI. Cognitive Psychology, 60(1), 1-39.